Government Investigations are Predicted to Rise in 2021 - How Should You Prepare?

Even the most buttoned-up enterprise is not immune to an investigation by the SEC or FTC. So what can you do to ease the burden of this unsavory experience?

Companies, and individuals for that matter, go to great lengths to avoid any sort of government investigation. This avoidance is fueled by the fear of a drawn out, painful investigation in which an organization’s sensitive information is exposed for government investigators to review. To add insult to injury, the process also opens companies up to the additional risk of information being inadvertently leaked as it is passed back and forth in cyberspace. And, while SEC enforcement cases may have been down in 2020, all signs are pointing to that number bouncing back - and then some - in 2021. Even the most buttoned-up enterprise is not immune to an investigation by the SEC or FTC. So what can you do to ease the burden of this unsavory experience?

Join us on Thursday, January 14 at 2pm EST for a live discussion featuring panelists whose careers have made the leap from government to corporate as they share their tips on turning to technology to ease the pain of a government investigation. David Markowitz of Goldman Sachs, Barrett Atwood of Lyft, and Dmitry Lukovsky of Western Digital will discuss how to overcome investigative challenges and gain back control of unyielding timelines.

Take the first step to prepare for a government investigation now and register for the live discussion today.

Stop the Panic: More clarity, less guesswork for data breach assessment

When incident response teams look to put response plans into action, panic often ensues. Exacerbating the panic is that data breach assessment is typically slow and difficult to perform accurately - especially with high data volumes. But there is a better way. 

Most large enterprises have well-formulated data breach response plans that are the clear-headed output of cross-functional teams across, privacy, data security, compliance and IT. However, when teams look to put these plans into action, panic often ensues. Exacerbating the panic is that data breach assessment is typically slow and difficult to perform accurately - especially with high data volumes. But there is a better way. 

Prop 24: What California’s New Privacy Law Means To You & Your Data

On November 3rd, California voted to ratify Prop 24 ballot initiative that expands and extends the regulations originally set down in the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which has been in effect since the start of this year. The amended legislation now known as the California Privacy Rights Act further extends what was the first state data privacy law in the US. 

Insights From The Inevitable: The Board’s Evolving View on Data Privacy

The Inevitable 2020 is a series of virtual discussions featuring Fortune 500 executives and thought leaders with a perspective on Artificial Intelligence's inevitable impact on the way we live and work. 

Insights From The Inevitable: The Anatomy of a Data Breach

On September 10th, in this, our seventh of The Inevitable 2020 Series, Text IQ brought together three experts in data security and privacy with three distinct vantage points: Legal Counsel, Cyber Insurer, and large consumer-facing multinational organization.

Insights From The Inevitable: Predictions on Federal Privacy Legislation

“91% of people polled think that there will be federal privacy legislation and it looks like the majority 55% believe that that'll happen in the next three to four years.” 

Protected Health Information: What You Need To Know

Protected Health Information, often referred to as PHI, is any personal information contained in a patient’s medical record and obtained during the course of medical treatment that, if disclosed, could reveal the identity of the patient. For many years healthcare providers and insurance companies freely exchanged and disclosed PHI. Unfortunately, this exchange of information often resulted in people losing or being denied health insurance due to newly onset or pre-existing conditions. However, that all changed in 1996 when Congress enacted the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA); and what originally started as a way to hold insurance companies accountable has morphed and expanded into so much more over the last couple of decades.